Wards and courier

If your team doesn’t buy a courier and doesn’t ward, you’re probably gonna lose. Even if you aren’t a support but your team doesn’t buy a courier just suck it up and buy it yourself. Here is a little trick with the courier, you don’t need to go to the base yourself to spawn it. Just buy it while you are in the lane and right click on the courier and drop it from stash. Now anyone can just go to base and spawn it for you, and considering how your team was reluctant on buying one in the first place, its going to be very soon. Now for the wards, they last for a limited time so they constantly need to be replaced. You need to know what is going on in the river and the jungle because they are big blind spots. Without wards you are just asking to be ganked. To ward just buy them and place them on the giant eyes you see. A ward near Roshan is also essential mid game (or early game if they have an Ursa, as he can do a very early solo Roshan, with the right items).

And if you are laning against heroes who go invisible, buy sentry wards ASAP. Sentry wards can also “see” enemy observer wards which you can then swiftly remove, or just keep them there and fool the enemy into thinking you are stupid. If you lose a tower, place an observer ward where the tower fell just to know whats going on beyond your field of view. Also you should know that your field of view is reduced drastically at night time (except for a few nocturnal heroes). Lastly placing wards in the enemy jungle, will not allow the jungle creeps to spawn, hurting his early farm capability. I will go into detail about the best places to put sentry wards in the jungle in another guide.

Video Game Tips: Incorporate Purposeful Practice To Improve Your Game

What is purposeful practice? It’s practice in a way where every moment counts. Where every rep, shot, stroke, or whatever the action may be is accomplished with complete focus and accurate feedback. There is a purpose going into a practice session and a determination to better the results afterwards. It’s not just going through the motions but constantly pushing the boundaries to see what is really possible. Only then can a player, person, and/or athlete truly grow.

That’s great, but how does this relate to competitive gaming and Halo 5? I didn’t completely grasp it until I sat down and talked with one of the best Halo 5 pros out there. “We practice more than anyone else, honestly. We know our weaknesses and work tirelessly at them.” This Halo professional went on to discuss how he incorporated purposeful practice through creating his own practice map.

By going into the Halo 5 game mode called Forge, he created a map with explosive targets that were evenly spread throughout. He then gave himself practice drills, such as how many of the explosive targets he could hit with each weapon in 90 seconds. This tested both accuracy and speed of shots. This would be done for all of the weapons in Halo 5, from the Sniper Rifle down to the Needler. He would then expand these drills to incorporate strafing, which is a motion from side to side to avoid being hit by incoming shots. After the 90 seconds was up, he would again note how many targets he hit with each weapon. His goal for next time would be to increase the number of targets he could hit in that same time frame. He would test not only his weapon skills, but also his grenade skills. By placing targets in hard to reach locations, he would need to execute precise grenade tosses to take them out.

So how does this help you? You can take the same measures a Halo 5 pro takes and incorporate them into your own game. By going into Forge mode, placing several explosive targets throughout the map, and then incorporating drills with a timer, you can work on your skills and have accurate feedback. You can note whether you are progressing or not and set accurate goals based on your skills. Whether your goal is to be a Halo 5 pro or just have more fun, purposeful practice will help you.

 

CP Explained

CP simply means Combat Power, and it’s the number above each wild Pokemon. It indicates their battle prowess, and as you gain more experience points (or XP) and level up as a Trainer, the CP of the Pokemon you find will become higher.

We’re still learning about Combat Power, but here’s what we know so far. In an individual Pokemon’s stat screen, you’ll see a semi-circle at the top. The part that’s bold with a dot at the end indicates that Pokemon’s current maximum Combat Point potential. Some Pokemon have higher maximum CP than others. For example, an intimidating, spiky Pinsir will likely be stronger than a tiny, wormy Caterpie. But, if you find a 50 CP Pikachu, that doesn’t mean it’s stronger than a 20 CP one. For efficiency’s sake, though, you’ll probably want to Power Up the 50 CP Pikachu with Candies.

Whether you Power Up or Evolve a Pokemon first is up to you. Some believe powering up a ‘Mon before evolving it results in even higher CP, but there’s no confirmation of that yet. But, your Pokemon’s max CP rises along with your Trainer level, so don’t neglect those curve balls (more on that shortly) and be sure to visit Pokestops whenever you can! Get dat XP!

Extra Note: It looks like your Pokemon’s weight/size (XL or XS) could affect their stats, like CP, HP, and dodge speed. Again, there’s a lot of rumor mongering and unconfirmed info out there at the moment, so that could be a bunch of Bouffalant hockey.